Win A Copy Of “The Eagle Of The Ninth”


Shutterstock / Serhii Bobyk © eagle

Many readers gained a first impression of Roman Britain through Rosemary Sutcliff’s entrancing story, “The Eagle Of The Ninth”. Were you one of them?

If so, you’ll remember it’s the first in a trilogy of books, along with “The Silver Branch” and “The Lantern Bearers”.

Since its first publication in 1954, it has sold more than a million copies, and been translated into over twenty languages.

Somehow, I missed out on this book at the “right” age. Reading it for the first time only a few years ago, I realised I’d missed a treat.

Set in the 2nd century AD, “The Eagle Of The Ninth” centres on the mystery of the Ninth Legion.

Four thousand men disappeared into the mists beyond Hadrian’s Wall and were never seen again. As the story begins, the missing commander’s son finds his own military career brought to an abrupt halt by injury.

Determined to discover what happened to the lost legion — and his father — young Marcus Flavius Aquila embarks on a dangerous quest in hostile Northern Britain.

I enjoyed Marcus’s adventures so much, I had to finish the rest of the trilogy in the same week!

Rosemary Sutcliff brings to life the sights, sounds and smells of those far-off days. For readers of any age, such writing is a joy.

You can find out more about Rosemary and her books in our January 9 issue, when Pat Coulter visits her home village.

About the author

Born in Surrey on December 14, 1920, Rosemary Sutcliff wrote more than 60 children’s books, historical novels, stories, radio, and TV scripts.

In 1975, she was awarded an OBE for her contribution to children’s literature. She was made a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature (FRSL) in 1982.

She was also a member of the Royal Society of Miniature Painters.

Rosemary was awarded a CBE in 1992, which was also the year she died.

Now, to mark 100 years since Rosemary’s birth, Oxford University Press has published a new centenary edition of “The Eagle Of The Ninth”, and one lucky reader can win a copy in our competition.

eagle

Image courtesy of Amazon.

“The Eagle Of The Ninth” is published in paperback by Oxford University Press, priced £8.99.

Enter our competition now for your chance to win a copy!

An error has occurred while loading your details. Please click the following link to try again - if the issue persists, please don't hesitate to contact us. Try again by refreshing the page.


For more competitions from “The People’s Friend”, click here.

Marion McGivern

As editor of the cookery, money, pets and eco pages, Marion covers a wide range of regular Features content. Along with the rest of the Team, she enjoys finding interesting features for both the weekly and Special issues that readers will love. Having so much variety every day means that over ten years with the “Friend” has just flown by!

Win A Copy Of “The Eagle Of The Ninth”

Shutterstock / Serhii Bobyk © eagle

Many readers gained a first impression of Roman Britain through Rosemary Sutcliff’s entrancing story, “The Eagle Of The Ninth”. Were you one of them?

If so, you’ll remember it’s the first in a trilogy of books, along with “The Silver Branch” and “The Lantern Bearers”.

Since its first publication in 1954, it has sold more than a million copies, and been translated into over twenty languages.

Somehow, I missed out on this book at the “right” age. Reading it for the first time only a few years ago, I realised I’d missed a treat.

Set in the 2nd century AD, “The Eagle Of The Ninth” centres on the mystery of the Ninth Legion.

Four thousand men disappeared into the mists beyond Hadrian’s Wall and were never seen again. As the story begins, the missing commander’s son finds his own military career brought to an abrupt halt by injury.

Determined to discover what happened to the lost legion — and his father — young Marcus Flavius Aquila embarks on a dangerous quest in hostile Northern Britain.

I enjoyed Marcus’s adventures so much, I had to finish the rest of the trilogy in the same week!

Rosemary Sutcliff brings to life the sights, sounds and smells of those far-off days. For readers of any age, such writing is a joy.

You can find out more about Rosemary and her books in our January 9 issue, when Pat Coulter visits her home village.

About the author

Born in Surrey on December 14, 1920, Rosemary Sutcliff wrote more than 60 children’s books, historical novels, stories, radio, and TV scripts.

In 1975, she was awarded an OBE for her contribution to children’s literature. She was made a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature (FRSL) in 1982.

She was also a member of the Royal Society of Miniature Painters.

Rosemary was awarded a CBE in 1992, which was also the year she died.

Now, to mark 100 years since Rosemary’s birth, Oxford University Press has published a new centenary edition of “The Eagle Of The Ninth”, and one lucky reader can win a copy in our competition.

eagle

Image courtesy of Amazon.

“The Eagle Of The Ninth” is published in paperback by Oxford University Press, priced £8.99.

Enter our competition now for your chance to win a copy!

An error has occurred while loading your details. Please click the following link to try again - if the issue persists, please don't hesitate to contact us. Try again by refreshing the page.


For more competitions from “The People’s Friend”, click here.

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