Earth Day: What Can We Do?


Shutterstock © Flying honey bee collecting pollen at yellow flower

On April 22 every year, people around the globe mark Earth Day. Find out more about Earth Day’s history, and what you can do to help…

Earth Day’s history

This annual event began in 1970, when US Senator Gaylord Nelson recruited a young activist, Denis Hayes, to organise campus teach-ins about environmental causes in America — in particular the protection of the environment against some of man’s more harmful activities.

It was so successful that April 22 each year became a day of protest and learning, eventually becoming internationally recognised as Earth Day. Building on the legacy of its founders, this special day is now a truly global event, and the largest day of protest in the world.

What can you do?

With the popularity of David Attenborough’s fascinating programmes on wildlife and our planet, and the interest around the world by young and old alike on looking after our planet for the next generation, climate change and its effects are firmly in the public eye.

It can be hard to know how to engage with such a worthy cause, but many hope that Earth Day each year can become a catalyst for change.

Earth Day

This year, the event is  “Planet vs. Plastics”, and the Earth Day organisation aims to encourage us all to reduce plastic dependency.

There are plenty of little steps you can take at home that can make a big difference.

Professor Cameron Hepburn, Director of the Oxford Martin Programme on the Future of Plastics and Battcock Professor of Environmental Economics at the Smith School of Enterprise and the Environment, briefly discuss the future of plastics and what you can do.

And what about wildlife?

Take a look at the below for some important hints and tips:

Despite the devastation of the Notre-Dame Cathedral fire back in 2019, nearly 200,000 bees living in hives on the roof there survived. Nature is undoubtedly resilient. But sometimes it just needs a little help from us!

For more information on Earth Day and how to get involved, visit the organisation’s website.

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Iain McDonald

I am the Digital Content Editor at the “Friend”, making me responsible for managing the flow of interesting and entertaining content on the magazine’s website and social media channels.

Earth Day: What Can We Do?

Shutterstock © Flying honey bee collecting pollen at yellow flower

On April 22 every year, people around the globe mark Earth Day. Find out more about Earth Day’s history, and what you can do to help…

Earth Day’s history

This annual event began in 1970, when US Senator Gaylord Nelson recruited a young activist, Denis Hayes, to organise campus teach-ins about environmental causes in America — in particular the protection of the environment against some of man’s more harmful activities.

It was so successful that April 22 each year became a day of protest and learning, eventually becoming internationally recognised as Earth Day. Building on the legacy of its founders, this special day is now a truly global event, and the largest day of protest in the world.

What can you do?

With the popularity of David Attenborough’s fascinating programmes on wildlife and our planet, and the interest around the world by young and old alike on looking after our planet for the next generation, climate change and its effects are firmly in the public eye.

It can be hard to know how to engage with such a worthy cause, but many hope that Earth Day each year can become a catalyst for change.

Earth Day

This year, the event is  “Planet vs. Plastics”, and the Earth Day organisation aims to encourage us all to reduce plastic dependency.

There are plenty of little steps you can take at home that can make a big difference.

Professor Cameron Hepburn, Director of the Oxford Martin Programme on the Future of Plastics and Battcock Professor of Environmental Economics at the Smith School of Enterprise and the Environment, briefly discuss the future of plastics and what you can do.

And what about wildlife?

Take a look at the below for some important hints and tips:

Despite the devastation of the Notre-Dame Cathedral fire back in 2019, nearly 200,000 bees living in hives on the roof there survived. Nature is undoubtedly resilient. But sometimes it just needs a little help from us!

For more information on Earth Day and how to get involved, visit the organisation’s website.

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