Top Tips On How To Avoid Scams


Shutterstock © A women in a pink top close up of hands holding a credit card in one hand and phone in the other

As we reach the end of the financial year, it’s peak time for scammers trying to trick people expecting tax information. Care home specialist, Lottie, have devised some top tips on how to avoid scams and stay savvy.

This is Co-Founder of Lottie, Chris Donnelly’s, advice.

1. Keep up to date with the latest scams

There are a number of HMRC scams circulating at the minute – so it’s important to be aware of the ways fraudsters may be trying to get in contact with you.

Text messages, cold calls and email are the most reported HMRC scams, often asking you to get in touch with a contact number provided or provide your bank details.

The way fraudsters operate can change quickly and an important part of reducing your risk of falling victim to fraud is staying clued up on the latest scams. Check the news and websites like Age UK to stay up to date.

2. Learn how to spot a scam

Tax frauds can happen at any time throughout the year but are more common during key dates, such as the end of the tax year or when government initiatives are first introduced.

As well as phone calls, emails, and text messages – fraudsters may even send letters to you, requesting for money or your personal information.

Scammers will often use pressuring language to encourage you to respond quickly – this is a common sign of a scam and designed to prevent you from thinking before you act. Similarly, being contacted out of the blue is another common sign of a scam.

3. Check in on your friends and family

Make sure you check-in with your loved ones, as anyone can be susceptible to scams, especially as they are becoming more sophisticated – share any updates on new or trending scams and talk about the warning signs of a scam together.

Talking to your loved ones about how their feelings can be a huge relief for you both and allow you to support them in reporting the fraud to cope with any stress, anxiety or worry they may be experiencing.

4. Report any suspicious activity

Most importantly, do not feel embarrassed about reporting fraud. There are organisations that can support you and you will help them track down the fraudsters.

HMRC are asking any people to report phishing scams directly to them, so they can track down the fraudsters and prevent scams like these continuing.

If you think you may have made a payment to a scammer or if you are worried that money may have been taken from your account, contact your bank. Use the phone number on your bank statement or a publicly listed number – avoid using any numbers provided by a cold caller.


Read more tips on how to avoid scams.

Jacqueline Munro

I am the Digital Content Editor at "The People's Friend", looking after our website, social media channels and podcast.

Top Tips On How To Avoid Scams

Shutterstock © A women in a pink top close up of hands holding a credit card in one hand and phone in the other

As we reach the end of the financial year, it’s peak time for scammers trying to trick people expecting tax information. Care home specialist, Lottie, have devised some top tips on how to avoid scams and stay savvy.

This is Co-Founder of Lottie, Chris Donnelly’s, advice.

1. Keep up to date with the latest scams

There are a number of HMRC scams circulating at the minute – so it’s important to be aware of the ways fraudsters may be trying to get in contact with you.

Text messages, cold calls and email are the most reported HMRC scams, often asking you to get in touch with a contact number provided or provide your bank details.

The way fraudsters operate can change quickly and an important part of reducing your risk of falling victim to fraud is staying clued up on the latest scams. Check the news and websites like Age UK to stay up to date.

2. Learn how to spot a scam

Tax frauds can happen at any time throughout the year but are more common during key dates, such as the end of the tax year or when government initiatives are first introduced.

As well as phone calls, emails, and text messages – fraudsters may even send letters to you, requesting for money or your personal information.

Scammers will often use pressuring language to encourage you to respond quickly – this is a common sign of a scam and designed to prevent you from thinking before you act. Similarly, being contacted out of the blue is another common sign of a scam.

3. Check in on your friends and family

Make sure you check-in with your loved ones, as anyone can be susceptible to scams, especially as they are becoming more sophisticated – share any updates on new or trending scams and talk about the warning signs of a scam together.

Talking to your loved ones about how their feelings can be a huge relief for you both and allow you to support them in reporting the fraud to cope with any stress, anxiety or worry they may be experiencing.

4. Report any suspicious activity

Most importantly, do not feel embarrassed about reporting fraud. There are organisations that can support you and you will help them track down the fraudsters.

HMRC are asking any people to report phishing scams directly to them, so they can track down the fraudsters and prevent scams like these continuing.

If you think you may have made a payment to a scammer or if you are worried that money may have been taken from your account, contact your bank. Use the phone number on your bank statement or a publicly listed number – avoid using any numbers provided by a cold caller.


Read more tips on how to avoid scams.

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