Are Sprouts Your Festive Favourite?


Shutterstock / oksana2010 © sprouts

Just when you think 2020 can’t get any stranger, a new survey has named brussels sprouts as the nation’s favourite vegetable for Christmas dinner.

Matalan surveyed over 2,000 Brits to find out how we spent Christmas in 2020, looking at everything from what we were wearing to what we were eating.

And according to their findings, the often-hated brussels sprout is the most popular vegetable for 2020. And the 5th most popular trimming overall!

To be fair, they are a great source of vitamins A, C and K (great for blood clotting), as well as folate and manganese.

And there are plenty of ways to “enjoy” them, too.

If you’re not a fan of plain boiled veg, for example, you could try them halved and roasted in a little olive oil.

Or you could try this fritter recipe, from a 1916 issue of the “Friend”!

What else did our survey say?

Perhaps unsurprisingly, the roast potato came out on top, with 65% of Brits saying their Christmas dinner would have been incomplete without them.

Gravy was next, with 59% of the vote.

And in keeping with this weird year, 5% of Brits had tomato ketchup on their Christmas dinner this year!


For some delicious recipe ideas (sprouts optional), click here.

Iain McDonald

I am the Digital Content Editor at the “Friend”, making me responsible for managing the flow of interesting and entertaining content on the magazine’s website and social media channels.

Are Sprouts Your Festive Favourite?

Shutterstock / oksana2010 © sprouts

Just when you think 2020 can’t get any stranger, a new survey has named brussels sprouts as the nation’s favourite vegetable for Christmas dinner.

Matalan surveyed over 2,000 Brits to find out how we spent Christmas in 2020, looking at everything from what we were wearing to what we were eating.

And according to their findings, the often-hated brussels sprout is the most popular vegetable for 2020. And the 5th most popular trimming overall!

To be fair, they are a great source of vitamins A, C and K (great for blood clotting), as well as folate and manganese.

And there are plenty of ways to “enjoy” them, too.

If you’re not a fan of plain boiled veg, for example, you could try them halved and roasted in a little olive oil.

Or you could try this fritter recipe, from a 1916 issue of the “Friend”!

What else did our survey say?

Perhaps unsurprisingly, the roast potato came out on top, with 65% of Brits saying their Christmas dinner would have been incomplete without them.

Gravy was next, with 59% of the vote.

And in keeping with this weird year, 5% of Brits had tomato ketchup on their Christmas dinner this year!


For some delicious recipe ideas (sprouts optional), click here.

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